USS Indpls Future Course

2007 Indianapolis Air Show

The USS Indianapolis Museum and the USS Indianapolis Survivors Organization collaborated during the air show to educate the public on the history of the ship and her crew. Survivors from all over the country came together to sign books and speak with the public about their experiences. The museum displayed many artifacts, including letters and telegrams to families of the lost at sea crewmembers. Click here to learn more and to view photos of the events.

The USS Indianapolis Museum and the Survivor's Organization are seeking information

The USS Indianapolis Museum and Survivor's Organization are seeking contact information on the families of the lost at sea and families of deceased survivors. Please contact the webmaster at webmaster@ussindianapolis.us

2007 USS Indianapolis Museum Gallery Ribbon Cutting and Survivor's Reunion

It took a collaborative effort between three distinct bodies to create a museum gallery today with a vision to grow into a more elaborate museum in the years ahead.  That gallery opened Saturday, July 7, during ceremonies inside the Indiana War Memorial, as part of the bi-annual USS Indianapolis Survivors Association reunion. Click here to learn more and to view photos of the events.

Jack Paul, USS Bassett, Builds and Donates a model of a LCVP

Jack Paul of Michigan built this model of the LCVP he was on-board during the night rescue of over 150 USS Indianapolis survivors by the men of the USS Bassett APD 73. Mr. Paul helped rescue the survivors by taking turns piloting the LCVP and pulling men from the sea. He remembers the rescue as a challenging time navigating the heavy waves at night around the hundreds of seriously injured men in the water. “Pulling the men from the water was very difficult due to their injuries and high sides of the LCVP,” said Paul.  He added, “The waves had to be timed so the LCVP would roll towards the men making it easier to reach and pull them up.” Trained as an engineer on LCVPs, he served on the USS Bassett from commissioning to decommissioning in 1946. Jack Paul is one of the many rescue heroes in the USS Indianapolis history. The LCVP (Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel or Higgins Boat) is 36 feet long with a 10.5 feet beam. Mr. Paul donated his model to the museum.

 

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Top: Jack Paul
Left to right: George Leigh, James Morgan, Al Hogan.

Jack Paul with his LCVP model.

 

USS Indianapolis Museum Traveling Educational Museum Visits JFK Junior High School in Naperville, Illinois.

Kennedy Junior High School in Naperville, Illinois hosted an educational event featuring the history of the USS Indianapolis. Survivor Mike Kuryla spoke of his experiences on Friday, April 20th and Monday, April 23rd, 2007. Hunter Scott, whose USS Indianapolis history project and research led to the exoneration of Captain Charles McVay in 2000, spoke to 8th grade classes on Monday, April 23rd. The museum provided artifacts and volunteers for the event.

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Tricia Frye, Lorraine Kuryla, Hunter Scott, Survivor Mike Kuryla and Jeff Nance at the Kennedy Junior High School USS Indianapolis Event. Hunter Scott spoke of his research project. Survivor Mike Kuryla shared his experiences on Community Night. Jeff Nance and Tricia Frye spoke with students about artifacts provided by the USS Indianapolis Museum.

An 8th grade student from Kennedy Junior High School reading a navigation workbook from the USS Indianapolis.

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Survivor Mike Kuryla and Principal Don Perry discuss letters and photos of USS Indianapolis crew members.

Hunter Scott and the Kurylas.

USS Indianapolis Museum Traveling Educational Museum Visits Acton Elementary School.

The week before Veteran’s Day, the USS Indianapolis Museum’s traveling educational museum visited the Acton Elementary School in Indianapolis, Indiana for three days.  Prior to visiting the educational museum, students read the new book written for grade school age students, “The Sinking of the USS Indianapolis” by Marc Tyler Nobleman from the We The People history series published by Compass Point Books.  The Acton Book Club members read the book “Left for Dead” by Pete Nelson published by Delacorte Press.  “Left for Dead” details the sinking of the USS Indianapolis and features the story of student, Hunter Scott whose USS Indianapolis history project and research led to the exoneration of Captain Charles McVay in 2000.  Both books are on the USS Indianapolis Museum’s recommended reading list for students and part of the reading lesson and history activity plan available from the Museum. Students had the opportunity to hear from USS Indianapolis Survivor, Jimmy O’Donnell who visited one day and talked about his personal experiences fighting for his life in the ocean for more than four days before rescue.

More than 800 students from Acton Elementary School and nearby schools visited the educational museum where they learned about the 13 year history of the USS Indianapolis by viewing displays, models and many artifacts including photographs, log books, crew photo albums, flags, uniforms and more.  Museum board members gave short presentations and answered questions from the students.  Fourth grade teacher, Student Council and Book Club leader, Leon Howland who contacted the Museum after seeing the traveling educational museum at the Indianapolis Air Show arranged for the Museum to visit the school.  Mr. Howland planned the reading and history program for all the grades. “The students really got interested in learning about ship’s history and Survivor’s stories from reading the books. Having the opportunity to meet a Survivor and view the artifacts in the Museum made the learning experience come alive for them,” said Mr. Howland. “This is one reading and history lesson the students will never forget,” added Mr. Howland.

The Student Council incorporated the history activity plan into several school programs and events leading up to the celebration of Veteran’s Day.  Programs included interesting USS Indianapolis history facts broadcasted on the student TV news each morning, decorating the school and hosting an evening for parents featuring a presentation from USS Indianapolis Survivor, Jimmy O’Donnell and a tour of the educational museum.  More than 100 parents and others from the community attended the evening event. The Student Council held a “Pennies for the Indy” event where students brought in pennies and other coins each day with the grade level bringing in the most was awarded with a pizza party.  The students collected a total of $1,200.00 that was donated to the Museum to build a special display that is to be announced.  The school will receive a recognition plaque on the display.  The Museum Board presented the school with a framed print of the USS Indianapolis signed by seven Survivors to hang in the hallway.  Acton Principal, Steven Peters said, “The excitement of having the Museum and special guests visit the school and the student’s involvement became the buzz of the school district and especially with the student’s parents.” Mr. Peters added, “We will do it again next year.”

If you are interested in having the traveling educational museum visit your school or community event contact Jeff Nance at artifacts@ussindianapolis.us or call 317-769-6014.

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Teacher Leon Howland, Principal Steven Peters, Museum Board Member Jeff Nance,  and Student Council members celebrate donating $1,200.00 to the USS Indianapolis Museum.

Survivor Jimmy O'Donnell, teacher Leon Howland and Museum Board Member Tom Curran answer student questions.

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Students listen carefully to Survivor Jimmy O’Donnell as he talks about what it was like to be in the ocean for almost five days before being rescued. Museum Board Member Tom Curran answers questions from the eager students.
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Students view artifacts from the USS Indianapolis rescue ships.

Students stand next the many floor stars featuring USS Indianapolis history facts.  
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A up close look at floor star featuring a USS Indianapolis history fact.

Parents enjoy viewing the traveling educational museum during Parents Night.

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Students view the various artifacts and models.

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aa Museum Board Members Ken McNamara and Tricia Frye outside the classroom home to the USS Indianapolis Museum traveling educational museum.
Indiana State Senator Patricia L. Miller and Museum Board Members Jeff Nance, Ken McNamara and Tricia Frye.  

The USS Indianapolis Museum Puts A Call Out for any USS Indianapolis and Associated Artifacts.

The Museum continues to receive or uncover more artifacts documenting the history of the USS Indianapolis. The Museum is putting out an official call to Survivors, families, individuals or organizations with any USS Indianapolis artifacts to consider donating them. The Museum is accepting donations of any artifacts from the moment it was decided to build the USS Indianapolis through the current day. For example, artifacts include items such as crew and family personal affects, artifacts from individuals who participated in the location, rescue, medical care and rehabilitation of the Survivors, pictures, documents, ship building plans and records, books, diaries, stories, any recorded audio and video, clothing, patches, flags, etc. Securing and documenting these artifacts at The Museum will help record and educate everyone about the USS Indianapolis history for all generations past, present and in the future. If you have any artifacts to donate, or know of a location of an artifact(s), please contact the museum at 317-769-6014.

Newspaper Donation IRRA

Roger and Peggy Ake of New Haven, Indiana show original August 15, 1945 newspapers they donated to the USS Indianapolis Museum:  The Indianapolis Star and Marion Leader-Tribune featuring the news story about USS Indianapolis sinking.  The Navy did not release the news of sinking until late on August 14, 1945.  The sinking news story appeared on August 15, 1945 with the news the Japanese surrendered and World War II was over.

Roy McLendon, President of the Indianapolis Rescue & Recovery Association presents Museum Board Member Tom Curran with a newly completely history of the ship and aircraft rescue story on DVD to play at the USS Indianapolis Museum.  Roy McLendon served on the USS Ringness that rescued 39 Survivors.  Tom Curran traveled to Pigeon Forge, TN to present the Museum plans to the IRRA at their annual reunion.

The USS Indianapolis Museum Puts A Call Out for any USS Indianapolis and Associated Artifacts.

The Museum continues to receive or uncover more artifacts documenting the history of the USS Indianapolis. The Museum is putting out an official call to Survivors, families, individuals or organizations with any USS Indianapolis artifacts to consider donating them. The Museum is accepting donations of any artifacts from the moment it was decided to build the USS Indianapolis through the current day. For example, artifacts include items such as crew and family personal affects, artifacts from individuals who participated in the location, rescue, medical care and rehabilitation of the Survivors, pictures, documents, ship building plans and records, books, diaries, stories, any recorded audio and video, clothing, patches, flags, etc. Securing and documenting these artifacts at The Museum will help record and educate everyone about the USS Indianapolis history for all generations past, present and in the future. If you have any artifacts to donate, or know of a location of an artifact(s), please contact the museum at 317-769-6014 or visit our web site at:
www.ussindianapolis.us

The last 18 months have been amazing for the museum. And with your continued support, we expect the future to bring even more growth and exciting news for The USS Indianapolis Museum!